Apparently Lot has learned quite a bit from his uncle Abraham. In the previous chapter, Abraham went out of his way to show hospitality to these very angels, and Lot is no different. His hospitality is a demonstration of his righteousness. Lot is understood to be a good man because “he pressed them strongly,” to stay with him, where they would be safe from the rest of the Sodomites. And it’s a good thing to, because look at how the men of Sodom treat the angels, even while they are under Lot’s roof.

 

 

If you read these verses carefully, then you noted that every single male member of the city is involved in the coming passage. This was not a few people; this was not even the majority. Abraham pleaded that the city would be saved if only ten righteous men are found in it, but every single man is involved in the wickedness of Sodom… except for Lot. While we find Lot’s response to the Sodomites in the next verses reprehensible, they are supposed to be in contrast to the evil sin of the rest of the Sodomites.

 

 

How awful that Lot would suggest his own daughters be taken and raped by the men of the city! Surely this isn’t a genuine offer by Lot? But it was. Lot was not a good man. As we will see later in the chapter, some of Israel’s greatest enemies are descended from Lot’s incestuous relationships with his own daughters. Lot is not meant to be a role model. The point is that even his horribly evil offer was denied by the Sodomites for a greater evil.

 

It is amazing that some people still argue that homosexuality is a perfectly permissible lifestyle. The Sodomites are attempting to have sex with these men (who are actually angels), and the Bible describes this as being worse than a father offering his daughters up as sacrifices for their lust! You can’t get much more wicked than that!

 

All sin is rebellion against God and worthy of His judgment, but the sin of Sodom had gotten so severe that they could not contain their lust.

 

 

 

The decline into slavery to sin is described by Paul in Romans 1:18-32.

 

i. First, man chooses to “suppress the truth” and ignore the righteousness of God (18-20).

ii. Second, he refuses to honour or give thanks to God (21a).

iii. This causes him to become futile in his thinking and his heart is hardened (21b).

iv. Fourth, he becomes a fool and begins to worship things that are not God (22-23).

v. Once they become fools, they start acting foolishly, particularly by giving in to the lusts of their hearts (24-25).

vi. This lust becomes exceedingly great when they then practice homosexuality (26-27).

vii. This leads to “all manner of unrighteousness” (28-31).

viii. And finally, to encouraging others to follow in their path (32).

Sodom and Gomorrah had made it to the end of this process. They were flagrantly practicing homosexuality, and insisting that any man visiting their town engage with them in this degradation. This was all the angels needed to witness to ensure that the cities must be destroyed.